South Africa


How the African Leadership Academy Is Fighting the Continent’s Education Exodus

Publication:
Date: 
November 29, 2010
A South African academy aims to teach the continent's brightest -- and fight widespread brain drain.

Lennon Chimbumu is the kind of young adult every mom dreams of raising. Polite and well spoken, the Zimbabwean 20-year-old will probably major in computer science at Stanford, where he's a freshman. During his first few months in the U.S., he felt some culture shock, but the time was also revelatory. He listened to the Beatles for the first time, and his roommate introduced him to more modern bands, such as the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Gorillaz. He's also been swept up by that most American of college experiences: football.

World Cup Legacy: More Bids to Get South Africans Out of Their Cars

Date: 
August 29, 2010
The Fan Walk – a car-free stretch in Cape Town that connected a downtown public soccer viewing area with a World Cup stadium – has spurred plans for more pedestrian malls at sporting events.

During this summer's World Cup, Somerset Road in Cape Town was transformed into a South African oddity: a road without cars.

They called it the Fan Walk, 1.6 miles of asphalt connecting a public soccer viewing area downtown with the newly constructed Green Point Stadium. The path was mobbed with people during the city's eight World Cup matches; a sea of fans, performers, and kids running wild. The street party was a big change for a city and country that has shied away from venturing beyond the comfort and security of the private automobile.

How To Use Jo'burg's Minibus Taxis

Publication:
Date: 
June 11, 2010
Using Johannesburg's unoffical transport system is an adventure in itself. Here's a beginner's guide

Carless in Johannesburg. It could be the title of a low-budget horror movie. A huge, sprawling greater metropolitan area of about 10 million people covering more than 600 square miles, the city is built for the car. If you're not in one, good luck – even though most drivers will be stuck in gridlock. I've been here for a few weeks and my main exposure to the city has been on foot. And I'm not alone. The overwhelming majority of Jo'burgers are carless.

Benefits and Burdens in Post-World Cup South Africa

Publication:
Date: 
August 2, 2010
The 2010 World Cup has ended in South Africa. What's left behind are a number of physical and cultural legacies that will be both landmark developments and potential economic hazards.

There are no vuvuzelas. The plastic horns had been blaring at random throughout the city of Johannesburg for the entire month of the 2010 World Cup, which has just finished here in South Africa. They were even blaring the month before the Cup started -- in the middle of the morning, out of car windows on the freeway, inside the city's endless shopping malls. But now that it's over, the loud honk that had become a part of the city's background static has faded out.

Out-of-This-World Cup Stadia in South Africa

Date: 
June 11, 2010
A look at four interesting stadia designed for the 2010 World Cup in South Africa, and their uncertain futures after the Cup.

Americans do like soccer, contrary to what many around the world believe. American architects, though? Hard to say. But even for the most soccer-agnostic architects, there are four good reasons to watch — or at least glancingly pay attention to — this year’s World Cup in South Africa. Four of the 10 stadia designed or renovated for this year’s quadrennial World Cup really are worth checking out beyond the context of international soccer matches.

The Infrastructural Benefit of South Africa's World Cup

Publication:
Date: 
May 10, 2010
Next month's World Cup in South Africa will bring a lot of attention to the country, and a lot of opportunity. Though many hope the country will see an economic benefit, the biggest impact is likely to be the creation of urban infrastructure.

In one month, the world's most popular sporting event will begin, drawing billions of spectators to screens all over the planet. In another month, it'll all be over.

The Challenges Facing South Africa and its World Cup

Publication:
Date: 
March 31, 2010
The road to qualify for the 2010 FIFA World Cup has been long for the 32 national teams that have made the final cut of the world’s most-watched international sporting event. But that road has been longer, rougher, and much more expensive for the Republic of South Africa, which was chosen as the host of the 2010 event back in 2004. In the intervening six years, South Africa has laid out a strategy for using the multi-city soccer tournament as a catalyst for local economic development and countrywide infrastructure investments.

Those preparations are underway, and the country has made broad physical and institutional improvements since being chosen to host the tournament. But with less than three months until kickoff on June 11, South Africa still faces many challenges and unanswered questions – not the least of which is what happens after the World Cup is over.